rydra_wong: The display board of a train reads "this train is fucked". (this train is fucked)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
In case anyone's got some spare cash they found down the back of the sofa:

The National Immigration Law Center have donation-matching up to $100,000 to help them create a Rapid Response Fund:

Donate to NILC

Planned Parenthood Action have donation-matching up to $350,000:

Donate to PP

The Climate Science Legal Defence Fund have matching up to $50,000:

Donate to the CSLDF

The National Network of Abortion Funds have matching up to $50,000, and their solicitation e-mail ends "Let’s fund abortion, build power, and radically love each other," bless them (they're also the only organization I've encountered where a staff member has their preferred pronouns in their sig, which makes me feel warm and fuzzy):

Donate to the NNAF

If you know of others, please comment!

(X-posted to [community profile] thisfinecrew.)
sovay: (Psholtii: in a bad mood)
[personal profile] sovay
I have had an absolutely rotten day, in which I think I can safely say that the best thing that happened to me was getting rated a "Yiddish flirting expert" by YIVO in an online quiz. (I mean, I don't know about that, but I can certainly read Yiddish well enough to translate those pick-up lines. I'd love to know where they came from.) I am also entertained to learn that the Massachusetts Historical Society has been tracking John Quincy Adams across the sea thanks to his daily habit of recording latitude and longitude on transatlantic voyages. Other than that, I wish it had been logistically possible for me to spend the day in bed.

[edit] After watching Vincente Minnelli's The Band Wagon (1953), I actually feel better. I love when that works. The "Girl Hunt Ballet" is even funnier if you have spent the last year and change immersed in pulp fiction and still bounced off Mickey Spillane.

go baby go go

27 Jun 2017 05:28 pm
moetushie: Beaton cartoon - a sexy revolution. (Default)
[personal profile] moetushie
Pick any story I've written, or, in the case of my longer, chaptered works, any chapter from any story I've written, and comment to this post with that selection. I will then give you the equivalent of a DVD commentary on that snippet: what I was thinking when I wrote it, why I wrote it in the first place, what's going on in the character's heads, why I chose certain words, what this moment means in the context of the rest of the fic, lots of awful puns, and anything else that you’d expect to find on a DVD commentary track.

My fic lives here.

Empress of Mars

27 Jun 2017 09:06 pm
purplecat: Texture by simpleandclean (LiveJournal) (Doctor Who)
[personal profile] purplecat
People compare Mark Gatiss who stories to the Pertwee era surprisingly often to my mind. I think he's on record as saying it's his favourite era of the show and it's true his stories tend to have a straight up monster or villain but the Pertwee era is typified, I would say, by the presence of overtly political themes (absent from Gatiss') work and a fairly sparse and functional approach to setting where Gatiss' (possibly because of his interest in Victoriana) tends towards the Gothic. In fact, apart from the fact Gatiss doesn't borrow from Horror tropes, I would have said that the Hinchcliffe era was a better point of comparison.

All of which is a long-winded way of saying that, no matter what the rest of the Internet might think, I can't really imagine Empress of Mars in the Pertwee era.

More under the cut )

This is, I get the impression, the episode that Gatiss has always wanted to write and I think it shows. It is having a lot of fun, telling a ripping yarn, and manages to feel both like a Doctor Who story and like a Scientific Romance.
ashlyme: (Default)
[personal profile] ashlyme
I spent most of the last week out West with [personal profile] cybermule [personal profile] cybermule . I introduced H to the Penny Woolcock, BSP-scored documentary From The Sea To The Land Beyond. We watched Who, Brett's Holmes, gardening programmes. We grubbed up celandine in her back garden, went out to swim (well, H and her son did, I read and watched from the shade of a yew tree) at a pool on the way to Clevedon. That day, the heat felt like a forcefield. Teenagers smoked dope and bantered in a dinghy. Saturday, we went to see Inkubus Sukkubus play at St Briavel's Castle in the Forest of Dean. The trip took us through Gloucester - there were two young lads on a horse-drawn cart at the edge of a main road. Gloucester is a place I want to spend a lot more time in. The little corner H took me through was a patchwork of time and architecture: the stubs of old priories, thirties terraces rubbing up against bits of industrial estate; a security alarm company in a half-timbered building, a park bench under a railway bridge. You'd go from graffiti of a rugby player to a spraypainted portrait of Dali with the turn of a street corner. We drank rhubarb cider and coffee-flavoured milk stout at a lovely pub called The Pelican.  Inkubus were good - they're the only Goth band I know of who've used a bodhran over a drum machine (take that Dr Avalanche!) - but the storytellers who preceded them were a bit earnest for my taste. The last day, we saw a thin fox near the coach stop, lots of ash in its coat; as my coach got into the city, I looked up from my book and saw the smoke from a factory hang absolutely still, just as if we were driving through a picture.

I've finished reading Alexandra Harris' wonderful Weatherland, a study of how England's climate has influenced its artists and writers, stretching from Beowulf to Turner's painted suns to a performance of Noyes Fludd held in a town itself prone to flooding. (The subject line is the last few words of the epilogue.) I've become fascinated by the "Claude glass", the black-tinted pocket mirror eighteenth century painters and tourists used to look at the landscape: it seems fit for a Jamesian haunting. You could also buy tinted lenses to overlay other times and weathers on the land: blue for moonlight, grey for fog, yellow for autumn.

My elderly Nokia died last week. H was lovely enough to give me a second-hand smartphone of hers. <3 I'm just getting used to a touchscreen keyboard. She also gave me a brazen crow's skull pendant, which I'm wearing now. I'll let you know if this changes anything with the local corbies....

(ETA: Not One Of Us have accepted my poem "Abhaus"! It might be out in the October issue. More news as and when.)

Meme for a rainy afternoon

27 Jun 2017 01:57 pm
el_staplador: Yuri Plisetsky from 'Yuri!!! on Ice' sticking his tongue out; caption 'makes me wanna barf' (yuri on ice)
[personal profile] el_staplador
Pick any story I've written, or, in the case of my longer, chaptered works, any chapter from any story I've written, and comment to this post with that selection. I will then give you the equivalent of a DVD commentary on that snippet: what I was thinking when I wrote it, why I wrote it in the first place, what's going on in the character's heads, why I chose certain words, what this moment means in the context of the rest of the fic, lots of awful puns, and anything else that you’d expect to find on a DVD commentary track.

My fics are here.


Also, I note with some amusement that the only fic mentioned in this post that I haven't actually managed to finish is The Fall of Strelsau. Though it's now sitting at 6,833 words, and yes, includes a by-election.
sovay: (I Claudius)
[personal profile] sovay
I enjoyed this review of a new biography of A.E. Housman, but I got to the last paragraph and disagreed so violently that I spent my shower fuming about it:

But that sweetness, verging on sentimentality, is also Housman's limitation: the lads and lasses slumbering under the grass, never growing old or sick or worrying about how to find a job. Sadness in Housman is a one-size-fits-all emotion, not one rooted in particulars. It puddles up automatically. And reading "A Shropshire Lad" you can find yourself becoming narcotized against feelings that are deeper and more complicated. That may be the real secret of the book's enduring popularity, the way it substitutes for a feeling of genuine loss the almost pleasant pain of nostalgia.

The reviewer claims earlier that "one reason 'A Shropshire Lad' has been so successful is that readers find there what they want to find," so perhaps I am merely following this well-worn tack, but I don't see how you can read Housman and miss the irony, the wryness, the sometimes bitterness and often ambiguity that never prevents the pleasure of a line that turns perfectly on itself. Some of his best poems seem to take themselves apart as they go. Some of them are hair-raising. Some of them are really funny. (It is impossible for me to take "When I was one-and-twenty" as a serious lament. In the same vein, it wasn't until tonight in the shower that I finally noticed that "Is my team ploughing" owes a cynical debt to "The Twa Corbies.") That is much more complicated than a haze of romantic angst and the vague sweet pain of lost content, especially seeing how much of Housman's language is vividly, specifically physical for all its doomed youth and fleeting time, not dreamy at all. Shoulder the sky, my lad, and drink your ale. I am not sure why the reviewer knocks Housman's Shropshire for not being "particular," either. Of course it's not actual Shropshire, where the poet himself acknowledged he never even spent much time. It's Housman's Arcadia, et ego and all. I finished the review and found myself thinking of Catullus—again, I had to have my hair full of soap before I realized why. I don't understand why anyone looks for the undiluted Housman in A Shropshire Lad any more than the Lesbia poems should be assumed to contain the authentic Catullus. Pieces of both of them, sure. But my grandmother didn't need the identity of the addressee of "Shake hands, we shall never be friends, all's over" pinned down in order to copy out the poem and save it after a college relationship broke up badly. (I thought it was hers for years.) Who cares if its second person was Moses Jackson or fictional? It spoke to a real loss. I don't think there is anything anesthetizing in that. I doubt Housman would have wanted the particulars known, anyway. I have to figure out a way to stop fuming and start being asleep.

(no subject)

27 Jun 2017 09:13 am
jekesta: (hexagons)
[personal profile] jekesta
1. All of my posts turn into angry rants about things I don't have words for.

2. Day Seven: A song about drugs or alcohol



It's so good this song exists because I can't think of ANY OTHER SONG I like about drugs and alcohol. There are much better categories of things people write songs about.

3. Richard Littlejohn apparently genuinely thinking of Oates as a guy that just fucked off when the going got hard makes me laugh every time I think about it.

4. It's my mum's birthday, so I've spent the morning making an afternoon tea of cake and jelly and sandwiches. Every time I make party food I plan it with logic and sense but when I'm making it I'm like 'just FOUR THOUSAND sandwiches? PEOPLE WILL STARVE' and I double everything. There is so much food in my fridge now and there are only going to be five of us.

Discworld fic rec

26 Jun 2017 10:45 pm
shyfoxling: Ravenclaw crest (Default)
[personal profile] shyfoxling
Mister Vimes'd Go Spare! by thezeppelins
Fandom: Discworld
Pairing/Characters: Mostly OCs, plenty of mentions of Sam Vimes, brief appearances from Anoia (Goddess of Things That Get Stuck In Drawers) and Dorfl the golem
Rating: not rated by author; general audiences
Words: 4855

Author's summary/notes: No summary given, but have a quote re: the premise: It felt to Lance-Constable Mangas as though everyone knew this news before it was spoken. By the time it came through the door of the Peristeri Street Watch House, it was already olds. His Grace, Sir Samuel Vimes of Ankh was dead.

My comment: "I was linked to this by a post on Tumblr, believe it or not. It’s awesome! Thanks for a great read. Pterry would be proud. Vimes would be…er… well, you know old Stoneface."

Quote:
She knelt down next to the small pile of ash. “Count Lucien Xavier Willem Mordecai Von Damascene, you are under arrest.” she said. Then she remembered Mister Vimes was watching. “Er, I mean… Consider yourself nicked, sunshine!”
moetushie: Beaton cartoon - a sexy revolution. (Default)
[personal profile] moetushie
I watched Moana on Netflix yesterday, and yes, I liked a lot. I loved Moana's determination and her spirit, and loved that her mission was to save her people (I love that she was undoubtedly her father's successor, no bullshit), not to find blah blah love. It's one of the rare movies that I didn't mind the CGI -- the water was really cool, and loved all the scenes where it peeled back to show sealife. Like that scene in The Prince of Egypt, during the Red Sea scene (although that was traditional animation and now I really want to watch The Prince of Egypt again.)

Moana reminded me in turns of Hercules (Maui and Herc would get along great -- and so would his tattoos and the Muses!) and Mulan and Lilo & Stitch -- not coincidentally, some of my favorite Disney movies. I wasn't too crazy about all the songs (god, the crab song when on way too long), but Moana had a lot of heart to it, which I thought was kind of missing from the last new Disney movie I've seen -- Frozen.

Anyway, as the very last person to see Moana, it was great! The scene of her ancestors voyaging across the ocean -- and then her doing it too -- really touched me. I hope Disney gives us more diverse princesses (or chief's daughters, in any case) in the future. It was really a lot of fun.

There was a meme on Twitter that asked for your top three Disney songs, and I ended up picking 2/3 songs from when I was coming up, during the Disney Renaissance (and a bit after.) My choices were Aladdin's "A Whole New World", The Little Mermaid's "Part of Your World" and Mulan's "Be A Man." What about you?

Denial on Tour 2017

26 Jun 2017 09:23 pm
purplecat: (dinosaur)
[personal profile] purplecat
We were supposed to be going to Bristol Comic Con but they cancelled the con. So instead we were let loose on the unsuspecting Bristol countryside.





More pictures under the cut )

Caldecott Monday: Owl Moon

26 Jun 2017 04:21 pm
osprey_archer: (books)
[personal profile] osprey_archer
We owned a copy of Owl Moon when I was a child, and while I don't remember reading it much, I always loved the cover: a little girl and her father walking up a snowy hillside, silhouetted by the moon. It's a scene of absolute peace and joy and just looking at it gives me a feeling of contentment.

The story is very sweet, too: the little girl and her father are going out in the woods at night to go "owling," that is, looking for owls. Not to hunt them or anything, just to see them in the peaceful quiet darkness of the woods.

When you go owling
you don't need words
or warmth
or anything but hope.
That's what Pa says.
The kind of hope
that flies
on silent wings
under a shining
Owl Moon.

*waves*

26 Jun 2017 08:21 pm
weaselett: (ds - dief and ray v - <3)
[personal profile] weaselett
I did not actually get any squares on my bingo card for knit in public day (which was bizarre as we were busy - but I think mostly busy with people avoiding the horrific weather that day!)

-

I have been doing better with reading actual books recently - and in doing so read two very different stories with Transgender lead characters, one good and one, not so good.

1 - The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson - This was the not so good. It has a lot of issues, and does a lot of strange things, and adds unessecary drama to something that should have plenty. It also randomly does lots of class stuff (with extreme!council estate v rich people, who are actually seemingly just middle class-ish....) Set in UK, so lots that jumped out at me than might have if set in US.
The author is not transgender but 'works with transgender youth, who were all really positive about her book'. A statement she actually makes at the end, which is painful and awkward.
I wouldn't recommend as a first trans character read, or a solid good plot - and it's got a lot of triggers to warn for (which includes transphobia, from everyone o.o - and sexual assault)

2 - If I was Your Girl by Meredith Russo - This is a good book, no issues that it doesn't own up to (none are big issues, unlike Williamson's book). It's an interesting story, lacking additional drama, and it covers the experience of transitioning, and how the character felt before and after. It feels a lot more real than the other. Set in the US, so I may not have noticed bits.
The author is transgender - and has a really lovely set of end notes (one for cis readers, one for non-cis readers). It lacks a wince worthy closing statement, and is generally really sincere.
100% recommend, triggers wise, shows transphobia but from a very different angle, and different treatment than the art of being normal, and there is violence towards the character.

-

This year, so far, I'm at 28 books read so far (not sure if will make the aim of 90, will have to see :s)

-

Long weekend this weekend, may go see wonder woman again.....will have to see how feel.

(no subject)

26 Jun 2017 10:22 am
lycomingst: (gatekeeper)
[personal profile] lycomingst
Netflix movie Doctor Strange )

When I went to the movies there were a couple of trailers that I liked. Something with Charlize Theron that’s very much like a Bond movie, impossible stunts, glamorous settings, explosions (we must have explosions). And a quieter dinner party movie with a good cast written by Mike White. I’m thinking about going to see it at the movies. I like Mike White; he is so weird.
sovay: (Sydney Carton)
[personal profile] sovay
So while I punted the first of my afternoon commitments, which was my cousins' letter-writing party, I did make it to the second, which was a picnic on Cambridge Common with the once and future Anarchist Society of Shakespeareans, and I had a much better time than I was expecting with the conversations ranging from children's books to family histories to competitive hospital stories (the other person won), and I admit that I bought the small neat teal-green Penguin edition of William Dampier's Piracy, Turtles & Flying Foxes (1697/2007) based almost strictly on its title, but the basement of the Harvard Book Store had about half a dozen of the Penguin Great Journeys in the travel section and I couldn't afford them all, and I am not looking forward to my doctor's appointment in about eight hours, especially since I stayed awake to write a post which I did not manage to finish, but the point here is that I would need to pry myself away from this keyboard no matter what, because I just exclaimed to [personal profile] spatch: "What price Hollywood? What price salvation now? But for Wales!—" by which I intended to convey my disappointment in screenwriters, and when I turn into quotations I need to head for bed.
rydra_wong: The display board of a train reads "this train is fucked". (this train is fucked)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
[tumblr.com profile] sashayed: It’s Not That Bad to F— Up While Calling Your Senator About Something Important

To prove this point, she presents actual transcripts of messages she left on her senators' voicemail, with her reaction gifs.

Sample:

Hi, uh, Sen. [Name]. And staff. [Nervous laughter.] My name is [Rave Sashayed] and I’m a constituent from [place where I vote]. I just wanted to call to thank you for standing up against the AHCA in the Senate. I–it’s an incredibly cruel and stupid and – and vicious bill. You know? And I’m not, like – a person who used to call her Senators all the time! know? I’m, like, a normal person! [Nervous laughter] But this – it’s crazy to me that this bill could become legislation. It directly affects me, it directly affects the people I love. I mean, it kicks millions of people off of Medicare for a tax break for – I mean. You know this. You’re. Uh. A Senator. So. You’ve read the bill. Um.

I would like to remind people that I phoned my MP's office and actually stated (completely incorrectly and randomly) that I lived in a place which said MP does not represent, had this pointed out to me and had to correct myself. AND YET (like Sashayed) I LIVE.

Right now, it looks like the Senate is wavering. Republican Senators are saying they "just don't know" if they've got the votes to pass the AHCA.

If you can't do phoning, you can't do phoning (I am sometimes a person who can't do phoning). But if you can, now's the time. IT IS OKAY TO PHONE AND FUCK IT UP. As long as you can communicate that you are opposed to the AHCA, that's enough.

Also, have some MOTHERFUCKING ICONS (photos of the ADAPT protestors being arrested during their protest at Mitch McConnell's office).

Dept. of Remembrance

25 Jun 2017 06:28 pm
kaffyr: Mid-afternoon view from the spirit world train. (Train view)
[personal profile] kaffyr
 Alexander, Bestest Old Pussycat

Under here. )
osprey_archer: (books)
[personal profile] osprey_archer
I criticized Martin Edwards' The Golden Age of Murder when I first read it, but I must say it has been a productive book for me in leading me to new and interesting authors: first to E. M. Delafield, who isn't even a murder mystery author but nonetheless got caught up with those who were (now that sounds like the plot of a detective story in itself), and now with George Bellairs' Death of a Busybody.

I must say I feel that E. M. Delafield was the more successful find. Bellairs, eh; Death of a Busybody is a perfectly adequate English country village mystery, but I don't feel the urge to search out any more books by him.

And his detective, Inspector Littlejohn, has given me a new appreciation for the depth Ngaio Marsh gave to her Inspector Alleyn. Now you may object that Inspector Alleyn is not exactly over-endowed with personality himself, which may be accurate when compared to the eccentricities of for instance a Poirot -

Speaking of Poirot, I saw Wonder Woman recently and the new Orient Express was one of the previews and maybe I just imprinted too hard on David Suchet, IDK, but I'm not sure I approve of this new Poirot. Do we need a new Poirot? Why all the remakes all the time???

ANYWAY. The point I intended to get to is that Inspector Littlejohn has no discernible personality at all. While I prefer this detective's personal lives to remain second fiddle to their mysteries, lest they throttle their books like strangler figs, it turns out that there is indeed such a thing as too little personality in a detective, too. Littlejohn is little more than a conduit for exposition, and mostly indistinguishable from the other characters who act as conduits of exposition in this book, which makes the thing sadly forgettable even though I enjoyed it in a mild way as I read it.

televisional thoughts

25 Jun 2017 11:10 pm
nostalgia: (twissy touchy)
[personal profile] nostalgia
oh yeah dr who was pretty great this week, but i am holding back on whether i love it based on how certain plotlines are dealt with next week. i do however have a new appreciation for john simm. i still prefer michelle gomez but lbr she's the best master since delgado so she'd be hard to beat.

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