lost_spook: (Northanger reading)
My parents are up visiting, so bear with me if I'm more erratic at commenting than usual - my socialising spoons are going elsewhere! But I thought I'd still do this today.

What I've Finished Reading

I got through my batch of library regencies (and didn't find any John Dickson Carr/Carter Dickson at my other library alas, nor did I find the earlier books in an interesting looking detective series I picked up a later installment of in a charity shop. I may just have to read out of order, dammit).


What I'm Reading Now

I'm still note-taking from In These Times: Living in Britain Through Napoleon's Wars 1793-1815 by Jenny Uglow, and as I'm now on p152, I can say that it's both useful and highly readable. (Not dry, despite its 640 pages, or at least I don't think so. It's just got plenty to talk about.)

Perdita by Paula Byrne, a life of Mary Robinson, which I picked up off my shelf when I was trying to see if I had any information about Gainsborough for my Scaroth story and got distracted into reading it. Mary Robinson was a late 18th C actress, mistress of the future George IV, and later one of the most popular Gothic novelists of her day. It's therefore pretty interesting so far, as you can imagine.

I'm sort of reading some other things, but not sure how they're going as yet. (Reading spoons are still variable.)


What I'm Reading Next

I think it'll take me a while to get through the above two and the redacted reading, but I may go to the library again in search of some more lighter material, because, as I said, reading spoons are still variable!

Or I may get distracted by something hanging about on a bookshelf; it happens a lot.
lost_spook: (dw - eleven reading knitting book)
[livejournal.com profile] liadtbunny asked: What would you recommend as a good, amiable fantasy or not very sci-fi sci-fi novel?

Now, I am so out of date on reading generally, let alone SF and Fantasy, that it would be laughable if I even tried to answer this question. However, I am pretty sure that you, my marvellous, book-loving flist will be able to, and with ease!

So, people... what do you reckon would be good? Prove to me that my confidence in you all is not mistaken and find Liadt some splendidly amiable genre reading matter!

Thank you! ♥


(And, Liadt, I know you said you'd heard of Terry Pratchett and that sounded as if you didn't want him recced, but seriously: Guards! Guards! - no silly fantasy names, a parody of all the detective/noir stories and with bonus dragons. I mean, it might as well have your name on it. Beyond that, I'm mostly highly out of date or stuck in the YA section as of five years ago.)
lost_spook: (carry on Richard O'C go away reading)
I usually ignore these, but, oh well, why not? I'm a little bored tonight. So, in what seems to be a sort of updated version of the BBC's Big Read list (with a mystery missing no. 19. I think I shall add in something I like. *evil*). Taken from [livejournal.com profile] justice_turtle:

There were rules, but I'm just going to bold the ones I've actually read, and make any relevant notes next to any of the others. I find predicting what I will or won't read in the future is unreliable. I think someone reckons the average most people will have read is 6. I think that's a bit pessimistic. I also, since I nicked it of JT, put in the full list of Carnegie winners as a contrast to the Newbery list. (They are the UK and US equivalents - the Newbery came first, though.)

Long booklist is long )

Carnegie winners )
lost_spook: (inkheart - fear kills everything)
6. Inkheart by Cornelia Funke

Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

Books were her home when she was somewhere strange - familiar voices, friends that never quarrelled with her, clever, powerful friends, daring and knowledgeable, tried and tested adventurers who had travelled far and wide.


Of all the books I probably wouldn't have read if I hadn't been a children's librarian, Inkheart has to be pretty high up on the list of my favourites. It's not only a gloriously old-fashioned, complex and engaging children's fantasy (in the best possible way, and beautifully written - or, very well translated, since I'm unable to read German), it's an exercise in pure bibliophilia. Inkheart is about book-loving Meggie, her book-binder (or book doctor) father, Mo, her great Aunt Elinor (a book collector who verges on bibliomania), an author and a number of escaped book characters. It's a genuine fantasy novel, but the only magic in it is the power of books and words, of printed paper pages, and reading, and writing - and reading aloud. And about the power, danger and addictiveness of stories and the imagination, of the contrast between fantasy and reality. It's also about the way that stories and characters have a life of their own that can't truly be owned by anybody, even their creators.

The hardback copy I first read (published by Chicken House) was lovely - covers, paper quality, typesetting, everything. A lot of thought went into having not just the cover art (which is nice, but not the thing here) but the whole feel of the book match the theme of it, of getting completely lost in a story. (Actually, I'm thinking now, given how much of it is also about loving the sheer physicality of books - the covers, the paper, their presence in the house, under the pillow, everywhere - it's a little ironic to think how many people are going to read an e-book version of this. That's not a criticism... just a passing thought.)

My only regret is that I couldn't have read it when I was 10 or 12 or so. On the other hand, whether I'd have ever been able to emerge again is a good question, so perhaps it's as well. It is, however, very much one of those books that is a worthwhile read at any age. (Stories have their own shape, and sometimes that shape is a children's novel. That doesn't automatically make it not worth reading by adults.)

Books are like flypapers )

Credits: textures by [livejournal.com profile] tiger_tyger

Book Meme

10/02/2010 07:55 pm
lost_spook: (Default)
Caught from just about everyone on my flist, because it looks like harmless fun.

1. Take five books off your bookshelf
2. Book #1 -- first sentence
3. Book #2 -- last sentence on page fifty
4. Book #3 -- second sentence on page one hundred
5. Book #4 -- next to the last sentence on page one hundred fifty
6. Book #5 -- final sentence of the book

Meme )

Book meme

22/01/2010 07:45 pm
lost_spook: (Five Guilty Reading)
Just about everyone on my flist seems to have been doing this book meme. I hesitated, because I couldn't think of answers, but on the other hand, I did find a strange thing in a book once...

Book meme )
lost_spook: (Five)
Edit: Sorry, LJ was refusing to cut everything the other day and now it's done it again.  Sorry about the long entry, but I am not playing about with it any more.  And it's eaten the links again.  *goes off to hit things*

I got this off [personal profile] persiflage_1 a couple of days ago and have been busy. In fact, really I am still busy, but there we go.

Memes under cut )
lost_spook: (Five)
I nicked this off [profile] daibhid_c- how could I, a children's librarian, pass up on this one? Of course, it's odd for me, as this meme assumes one has stopped reading children's books. Heh.

Books, glorious books! )

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