WIP Meme

23 May 2017 01:24 pm
lost_spook: (pg - lynda)
The return of that meme where you post random lines from any WIPs you have at the moment, because I felt like it.

(I see that I last did it in Jan 2016, which reminds me, I never did post that AAL! snippet as it stands. I should do that.)


More bondage, vampires, and fatal disasters under here )


That's four out of eight which are still the same old WIPs (and three from the previous post which I did complete in the meantime), but, to be fair, I keep writing and finishing other things in the meantime. I mean, I have [community profile] trope_bingo to finish and then I can destroy worlds for [community profile] tic_tac_woe! (I won't say nothing in the world can stop me, because some days it seems that just about anything in the world can stop me, especially in summer.)
lost_spook: (Northanger reading)
(My friends came, had a nice time, liked each other, and went. I am now vv tired and also have not yet watched DW, because vv tired so catching up must wait, but in the meantime, one of two posts I made earlier; in this case my final Yuletide recs post. <3)



Somewhat belated, but better late than never, as they say.

19 recs in Discworld, Georgette Heyer, Howl's Moving Castle, Hundred & One Dalmatians, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, King Lear, The Librarians, North & South, Northanger Abbey, Owl Service, Poldark, Timeless & Victoria )
lost_spook: (Northanger reading)
What I've Just Finished Reading

I finished Post-Captain by Patrick O'Brian, so I'm now committed to the series! I'm continuing to enjoy them, and this one was probably less technical than the first, or I'm getting to be less of a landlubber. Highlights being the bear escape mentioned last time and when Stephen decided a hive of bees are a perfectly reasonable thing to keep on board a ship. (It's very satisfying to have made a small dent in my TBR pile as well, because I was rather beginning to think I would never read anything new again that wasn't a regency romance.)

Before I finished that, however, I found another Regency romance in a charity shop (well, actually I found two, but the other was the usual, complete with someone called Carolyn) - from 1972!

I complain all the time about the modern ones not being like Heyer, now let me be nothing if not inconsistent and complain about Clare Darcy's Cecily for being too much like Heyer! The blatant copying left me open-mouthed. Her plot is her own, but all the Heyer ingredients and descriptions are present and correct... and, alas, have nothing of the engaging liveliness of Heyer. I'm not surprised Heyer used to get angry about this sort of thing. Clare Darcy was only lucky that Ms Heyer was probably dead by the time this book crossed the ocean.

It was an interesting read, though, and would have been better had the hero and the heroine actually had more time together on the page. Probably. Actually, it would have been better if it had just focused on the heroine's aunt and the hero's mother and their disapproving alliance, because that bit was her own, and a little more enjoyable than the rest. Everyone else should just go home for being pale copies of Heyer characters. Charity Girl was published the same year, and even though that is not my favourite Heyer, it still has a lot more going for it than a copy of the real thing.


What I'm reading now

I am just a few pages into HMS Surprise. There has not been a bear so far, sadly.

I'm still reading and taking notes from Jenny Uglow's In These Times, which continues to be an excellent social history of Britain in the Napoleonic War era. (There are no people called Carolyn in it. So far.)


What I'm Reading Next

I still haven't read that Daisy Dalrymple mystery, because I found two Regency romances for my light-reading needs instead, so that needs to get read so it can go back to the library.

I don't know what else will be next, or if I'll even get to Daisy, but I did find the first of Frances Brody's series of Kate Shackleton mysteries in a charity shop, hurrah, so that'll probably get read sometime soon, because I do need to get to the one I found first with the tantalising title of Death of an Avid Reader.
lost_spook: (Northanger reading)
Given that I only do it about once every three weeks, and I was due, I'm going to be a rebel and talk about reading on Saturday...


What I've Finished Reading

I mentioned elsewhere that I read my way through MC Beaton's Daughters of Mannerling series, but I think I have to mention the evil manor house one more time here, because that was the best and most unexpected concept I've come across in a Regency Romance series. I want to steal it and do other stuff with it, but that would be Wrong. (Although, I suppose that is what fic is for. I'm pretty sure there's a crossover there waiting to happen, but I'm not sure what it would be, and I have to return the series to the library this week.)

Otherwise, I have read Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brian, as I have a the first few of the Aubrey-Maturin series sitting on my TBR pile and now was the moment, it seemed. I read it okay, even though it's quite dense! (I may have skipped over some sea-related detail, reading is hard work enough as it is sometimes). But I enjoyed it so far and liked the characters a lot, and am looking forward to attempting the rest.


What I'm Reading Now

I temporarily (I hope) abandoned Perdita because it was giving me a headache (which is all to do with me and not with it), but I'm currently re-reading The Foundling by Georgette Heyer. I rashly gave away a whole lot of books when I had 13 libraries of my own to play with and this was one of them, and on Thursday I found it in a charity shop and have replaced it! Naturally, I had to re-read it, and it is probably more entertaining than ever. I didn't like it anything so much as some of the others when I first read it, which I can understand, looking back, given that it's rather less of a romance than most of the others, but it is pretty much a book that can be described as "shenanigans" and that's never something to be sneezed at.

I've also started Post-Captain, the second Aubrey-Maturin novel, but faithlessly abandoned it for The Foundling. (They were on land for a bit, which involved actual women (hurrah!) and obviously necessitated Jack being disguised as a bear. Not because of the women, though.)

In historical note-taking, I'm still working my way through Jenny Uglow's In These Times, which continues to be excellent. (I'm over half-way now and kind of sorry to be in many ways.)

I realise this is all very 'Regency'-flavoured, but that was accidental.


What I'm Reading Next

I have a Daisy Dalrymple murder mystery that someone recommended, and it's due back at the library... on Tuesday. So maybe I'll read enough of that to see whether I want to renew it or not, or perhaps even finish it in time. (It looks fairly slight; I might do it!)

Otherwise, I think I'll be a while with Post-Captain.
lost_spook: (s&s - silver)
For the Talking Meme, from [personal profile] scripsi: Favourite period in history?

I'm not entirely sure I really have one. I'm pretty widely interested in history because, well, history is everything that ever happened and everybody who ever lived anywhere up until now, and people do tend to be odd and fascinating, and it's often the only way to understand how the world interacts - everything starts to make more sense when you learn something of the history of places and people. (Although it's fair to say that I don't enjoy some types of history - like that module of economic history I once had to do. It was useful, though, I have to admit. Even if it did contain terms like 'stagflation.' Economic history = not my thing, except in a more social history context. And I have mixed feelings about 20th C stuff, because it is a bit recent - but, OTOH, also interesting. It's all interesting when done right, that's the problem! History's only ever boring when it's history of a really dull technical subject or history done wrong by terrible history teachers.)

By default and not really by choice most history I've studied has been US or British (and mostly English, because it usually is, although some Welsh; I did go to uni at Aberystwyth) and what I've read most since has been for family history purposes, which means a lot of 18th-20th C British social history.

That said, I definitely love reading about the eighteenth century (usually British, see above, sorry), especially late 18th C and into the early 19th C - it's just far enough away to be alien and fascinating and yet near enough in terms of evidence left behind people, and, of course, it's the first period for which you start to have novels as well as letters and diaries, poems, plays, and official records. So, the long eighteenth century, maybe?

On the other hand, there's always something completely fascinating about seventeenth century history, and sixteenth century - and Shadow of the Tower got me interested in the reign of Henry VII (it's amazing how many history books on the Tudors skip straight to Henry VIII, and yet the period of 1483-1509 is no less lacking in incident just because the king wasn't busy chopping off his wives' heads).

And I've always loved everything around 1066 and want to read loads more about Anglo-Saxon England - and I loved my module on Roman history, and I really ought to be a lot less parochial and fill in some more European gaps, and beyond. And when I was a teenager, I got completely fascinated and obsessed by mid-Twentieth Century Chinese history, too. And I should definitely read more about Disraeli and Gladstone, because Disraeli and Gladstone, and I haven't since I was at college (UK college, not university), which is just wrong.

It's just... a mass of stories and people being stranger and worse and better than anyone could possibly imagine and there'll never be enough time to find out about it all. But I do like late eighteenth century things quite a lot, it's true.
lost_spook: (dw - amy)
My fic is now a thing! It's very weird, I know, but hopefully also entertaining, and at last Count Scarlioni has fic. This involved having to rewatch City of Death for research, which, as you must admit, is about as good as research gets. (I also listened to the commentary and Julian Glover wanted to know about Scaroth's love life/lives, so I felt all vindicated for writing weird borderline-shippy fic. I mean, if Julian Glover asked for it, who am I to disoblige? ;-p)

Anyway, my entry for the Minor Characters Ficathon 2017:

Author: [livejournal.com profile] lost_spook
Title: Gothic Romance
Rating: Teen
Word Count: 7369 words
Characters/Pairings: Scaroth | Count Scarlioni/Clara Splinter, Great Intelligence Splinter (plus bonus guest appearances).
Notes/Warnings: For inevitable Clara splinter death, mainly, plus slight forced marriage of convenience dodginess. With many thanks to Persiflage for beta-ing it at short notice. Written for [livejournal.com profile] dw_guestfest 2017; also for the [livejournal.com profile] dw_allsorts prompt “love is done,” [community profile] trope_bingo square “fake relationship,” and [livejournal.com profile] hc_bingo square “tentacles.”
Summary: It is a fact universally acknowledged that any beings splintered in time will inevitably run into each other. No law says it has to end well, though…

Gothic Romance (on AO3) | at the Teaspoon (awaiting approval as yet).

*goes off to have lunch*
lost_spook: (Northanger reading)
(Because let's do this thing. :-D)

What I've Just Finished Reading

Nothing, actually. Since last time, I finished The Return of Sherlock Holmes, read two more Regency Romances made of pure fluff, and meanwhile carried on reading and taking notes from Eavesdropping on Jane Austen's England (which I haven't yet finished but continues to be very good).


What I'm Reading Now

Currently, a book randomly picked up in a charity shop, Mrs Jeffries on the Trail by Emily Brightwell, which is basically crime fluff rather than Romance fluff - one of a long series* about a Victorian housekeeper who solves crimes for her Inspector employer. Well, actually the whole household solves the mysteries, and she just co-ordinates them and tactfully hints about their finds to the Inspector. I'm not sure when they get the housework done. So far, all I can say is that it's certainly easy reading, which is what I wanted.


What I'm Reading Next

Ah, the part of the meme where I'm supposed to predict the future. Well, meme, it'll either be something off my to-read pile, or something random that I picked up somewhere else, or a safe re-read, I can tell you that much. *nods*

And when I've finished the current NF read, I'll probably start on The Book of Barnstaple, which is a bit more specific than general, but of use to me.


* Going by the list of about 100 others in the front, anyway. Mrs Jeffries keeps busy.
lost_spook: (Northanger reading)
(Gosh, bi-monthly. Look at me. :-D)

What I've Just Finished Reading

The House of Silk by Anthony Horowitz, which a friend gave me for Christmas. This was the book that looked liked the easiest going off my to read when spoons pile, and it was. It was a recent Sherlock Holmes 'missing adventure' type novel and ticked all the boxes and was fun.

I then happened upon three more actual Sherlock Holmes books in a charity shop soon after and got them, so I've been re-reading for the first time in years The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes and The Hound of the Baskervilles, all of which were perfectly readable, yay. (I feel v proud of myself). Interestingly, with the actual books it is very easy to hear Douglas Wilmer and Nigel Stock, which helps, but not so much with the 'new' one. (Anthony Horowitz was imagining Jeremy Brett, he said. I wouldn't have supposed it would make much difference which classic Holmes model you used but maybe it does.)

I also read and took notes from Barnstaple's Vanished Lace Industry by Peter Christie & Deborah Gahan. Obviously, this was a very specific local history book for family history purposes, so not likely to be of general interest, but it was useful (and not as dull as the title sounds). It did, however, reinforce my feeling from reading the North Devon Journal entries that Barnstaple is very possibly not a real place, although I don't know what that says about me or my Granny's relatives. It could explain a lot...


What I'm Reading Now

The Return of Sherlock Holmes (I got to the bit where Holmes reappeared, as you do; priceless), and in NF note-taking the very light and readable Eavesdropping on Jane Austen's England by Roy and Lesley Adkins. I would recommend it to all Regency Romance authors as it included a short section on naming and how most people didn't have middle names. (I know I'm mean about names, but the "What's your middle name?" question is a particularly head!deskworthy point every time it occurs.)


What I'm Reading Next

I don't know, meme! I'm only on the first few pages of "The Empty House", honestly. It depends on my mood and my spoons and what I find next in a charity shop or library to distract me from the to be read pile. But I do feel reasonably sure that there will be a next book now, and that's a good feeling. (Tomorrow, the world, people! \o/)


ETA: I'm still taking questions/topics for the Talking Meme *looks around hopefully*
lost_spook: (Northanger reading)
(I'm still not doing anything for [community profile] fandom_stocking. Luckily it should open soon and then I can relax and do something else! I forget, of course, that 'better' when you've been bad is a relative term.

Also I seem to have given the impression to everyone that Manhunt is rubbish and it really isn't; it was just a bit up and down and sexist to begin with & I get very little out of protracted 'action' sequences. It's now reached an impressively consistent high standard. Vincent, Nina, and Jimmy, though, remain the most rubbish. Strangely, everyone was a lot more interested in watching it despite this, much more so than anybody is when I tell them old TV is good. Reverse psychology??)

Anyway, look at me, this makes it twice in a year (not calendar year) at least this time. I probably won't read enough to make it every Wednesday, but hopefully more often. I am optimistic!

What I've Just Finished Reading

And So To Murder by Carter Dickson, which I finished up quite quickly after I posted the other day. It was good fun and I enjoyed it. I still don't know whether to praise the BBC for giving me lovely mental casting (the three characters who were the most fun were played by Suzanne Neve, William Russell, and Stephanie Bidmead) or curse them for burninating it, but it did add to the book, so I suppose I'd better at least be a tiny bit grateful.

As I said, Monica Stanton (aka Suzanne Neve) is a vicar's daughter who writes a steamy Romance novel in 1939; her aunt, distressed, wonders why she couldn't write a nice detective novel, like those by Bill Cartwright (Wm Russell):

Now Monica Stanton, to begin with, had no real grievance against that inoffensive form of entertainment known as the detective-story. She neither liked nor disliked it. She had read a few, which struck her as being rather far-fetched and slightly silly, although doubtless tolerable enough if you liked that sort of thing. But, by the time her aunt had finished, Monica was in such a state that she had come to curse the day Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born. It was a wordless, mindless passion of hatred. As for Mr William Cartwright... Monica felt that she would like to poison Mr Cartwright with curare, and dance on his grave.

Read more... )

Before Christmas, I can now say that I was for obvious reasons, re-reading a lot of Miss Marple as well as reading Dracula for the first time (my reactions are in my Yuletide reveals post).

I also finished Venetia by Georgette Heyer, a re-read, although it was one of the books I rashly gave away a while ago, so it had been a long time. Very enjoyable, of course, and I am very happy to have a copy again. It is very sad that after a year of reading Regency Romances, I still haven't found anyone even a tiny bit like Georgette Heyer. I wish there would be, somewhere, in some period or other.


What I'm Reading Now

I'm a bit between things, but I continue with the very excellent The Victorian City by Judith Flanders in NF. (I am even taking notes for family history, which is a very exciting development as of the last few weeks and months. It's taken a bit of patient building up, but I'm able to do it a little again.)


What I'm Reading Next

That is the question. I was looking at my TBR (when spoons) pile and seeing whether any of them clicked easily, but I haven't decided which one to try next or whether just to re-read something to build up a little more stress-free stamina first before I risk reading a new-to-me book that might get killed by CFS. (I'd rather wait and be fair in my first reading). We shall see!
lost_spook: (b7 - deva)
I have finally started watching The Caesars (ITV 1967/8), after a delay because I wanted a break from non-restored scratchy old 1960s b&w telly (great as it may be). I've now seen episode 1 ("Augustus"). Details under here, especially re. I Claudius for those who are interested )

Anyway, I looked it up on Wiki, wondering if they had any further info - I mean, it can't have been influenced by the IC TV series of course, but what about the book? Was it deliberately being written against that or not even regarding it? Wiki didn't tell me, but it did link me to this entrancingly long list of film & TV set in Ancient Rome. (And, ironically, it's missed off The Caesars, although it is on their list of Historical dramas). Has anyone set out to watch their way through the lot? It's the internet, surely someone must have done?

Which then led to me looking at their linked list historical drama films (& TV). How long would it take to watch through history by fictional series/films?

Is it just me or is the idea of taking a period and watching everything you can strangely enticing? Oh, noes, who let me out near a list? At the very least I want to copy it and tick off everything I have watched and things I know that they missed off (and am not looking at their list of all historical fiction in books, film and TV...)
lost_spook: (Default)
Deciding on what to icon next takes far longer than making icon sets... Anyway, I remembered that I wanted to cap and icon some of the Margaret Lockwood films and as this set was clearly meant for The Wicked Lady (1945), that's what I did. (Featuring Margaret Lockwood, Patricia Roc, James Mason, Griffith Jones & Michael Rennie.)

Teaser:

 photo caroline1_zpscpzef4l7.png  photo kiss1_zpsuraweuks.png  photo ac3_zpsk8v8yh9i.png

Why did you shoot that horse? I'd rather kill a man any day! )

Credits: Screencaps my own. Textures by tiger_tyger. The usual rules apply: want, take, have, credit. Comments = ♥ and hotlinkers will be shot down like a dog on the highway.
lost_spook: (Northanger reading)
I really should get on with these because a) they were lovely questions and b) it is really not summer now. It's not even 2015. *cough*

For [livejournal.com profile] persiflage_1: What's the best new-to-you book you've read so far this year?

Well, it has been a while since July 2015 when Pers asked me this, but I think it is fair to say that the answer is still undoubtedly The Count of Monte Cristo, which I managed to read last spring. I had avoided it when reading other Dumas novels as a teenager because it was large and I thought it was about someone being in prison for years and finally getting out and having revenge. While that is kind of true, it turns out, Edmond is in prison only for a small part of the book (I know, I feel v dumb that I ever even vaguely thought Dumas would write endless grim prison fiction, lol me) and it is surely the most entertaining revenge tale ever told.

I don't know how my brain works: I can read so little without getting a headache and then I pick up a 1000 page brick and go "ooh, now this I can manage!" and basically solely in terms of having something long and enjoyable (I so rarely enjoy books because they are just such an effort; it's one of the main things I hate about being ill), it was amazing. I should think it is also a pretty darn great old-fashioned ride of improbable long, complicated revenge scheme even when you're not ill.

If you hate it, btw, this is one of those times when I will love you a lot if you don't feel the need to share that fact with me. Thank you.

Anyway, it is all the things (poison and runaway lesbians and treasure and random drug-taking and pirates and bandits and long-lost relatives and cunning disguises! Other things I have since forgot!) and only slows in a few sections where there is too long an absence of the Count, and it is both awesome and ridiculous, regardless of any faults, and I could have taken another few hundred pages of it, easy.


Coming up some way behind it, I thought The Invention of Murder by Judith Flanders was pretty great, too (an NF book about the Victorians and their obsession with murder) but that was not a magical huge novel that only rarely gave me headaches. Which is not its fault. It's definitely a recommended read for people with an interest in such things and a brain. Victorians, newspapers and lurid murders and the growth of detection fiction is a wonderful subject for a history book & the author is pretty reliably good.


Plus, in Jan 2015, I managed to finally finish the last few chapters of The English Civil War by Diane Purkiss, which was also excellent (even if I had five years or so in between the first 3/4s and the last). It deals with the Civil War (duh) but from all sorts of different points of views and aspects & is thoroughly engaging and readable. The author clearly has a passion for the era she's keen to communicate. It also mentioned my home town, which gets it extra bonus points, obviously.


But basically Le Comte de Monte Cristo is a thing of endless delight & my brain is a mystery. I feel bad for teenaged me for missing it when I could have read it totally without any adult reservation or irony or headaches, but on the other hand, I seem to have needed it last year.
lost_spook: (Default)
Well, Reveals have happened, and I'm now free to talk about what I wrote. My assignment, fairly amusingly and not very surprisingly, was for [livejournal.com profile] liadtbunny, who had requested various lovely things, including Adam Adamant Lives!. And you'll remember that this time last year I was all aglow with just having discovered the series and what a joy it was, and now I've wound up all aglow again with having reminded myself just what a joy it is. If you're a Classic Who/Avengers etc. fan you should head off to watch it now.

Cut for some talk about the writing )

Anyway, enough of the waffling, here's the fic:

The Maze of Terror (7274 words) by lost_spook
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Adam Adamant Lives!
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Adam Adamant & Georgina Jones & William E. Simms
Characters: Adam Llewellyn De Vere Adamant, Georgina Jones, William E. Simms, Original Characters
Additional Tags: Yuletide, Hijinks & Shenanigans, Case Fic, Humor, 1960s
Summary: Georgie’s received the invitation of a lifetime, Simms is starstruck, and Adam is on the trail of an unspeakable villain who’s terrifying people to death – literally!


Also I wrote two treats, in The Moonstone and The Reluctant Widow )


And thanks to Liadt, who wrote my Madness SotT/Ten Stupidest Things fic, How Now Brown Monkey! (I knew it was you! In fact, I strongly suspected it was you when I saw someone had posted SotT in the first place. You're a star! ♥) And my gift proper was written by DeCarabas, whom I don't know and maybe doesn't LJ, but oh my, they so made my Yuletide with that wonderful piece. (I'm feeling guilty enough about requesting a super-super-obscure and uncool fandom and making someone write in it; I'm now also eyeing the other two comments on it, because it kind of looks as if they haven't actually got what's going on. I said it was subtle; I didn't think it was that subtle, but maybe it was to someone who doesn't know all the stuff I wrote in my letter? (Or maybe it was just the other aspect they chose to comment on??) DeCarabas got so much of that in, really quietly and non-crackily, it was awesome. (But, okay, what Dr Seward thinks he is doing is not necessarily what he is doing/what's really happening. It's brilliant. I love it to pieces. Usefully ambiguous headcanon totally accepted. ♥)

Bookmarks and Garlic Flowers (1061 words) by DeCarabas
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Dracula (TV 1968), Dracula & Related Fandoms
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Mina Harker/Lucy Weston/John Seward
Characters: John Seward, Mina Harker, Lucy Weston
Additional Tags: Post-Canon
Summary: On rational explanations.


I guessed two of Liadt's fics, and one of Paranoidangel's, and otherwise, I was as clueless as ever, but it was fun. Here's to the last of the reccing and commenting - and to the New Year's Resolution Collection 2016! (I am resolved to write one this year; last year I didn't and I wished I had.)
lost_spook: (Northanger reading)
Forsyte Saga (BBC 1967) Fleur/Jon picspam (10 Tumblr graphics; 88 pics) for [livejournal.com profile] hc_bingo square "forbidden love". (And completing two possible bingos at once! \o/ Well, it can still only be one bingo, but I get to choose which one I claim. If I don't complete another possible bingo before I'm done. Ha.)

Notes: Fleur Forsyte/Jon Forsyte picspam (also some Fleur/Michael, Jon/Ann), plus Soames and Irene. Warnings for infidelity & spoilers for very old TV and literature. (Feat. Susan Hampshire, Martin Jarvis, Eric Porter, Nyree Dawn Porter, Nicholas Pennell, Anne Fernald.) It got a bit ridiculously epic, but I blame that on Susan Hampshire's face.

Also, sorry, being obscure again, but, look, a second 'impossible' bingo square completed! How could I not? (I'm still on Team Michael, though.)

I've staked my claim, you're mine )
lost_spook: (I Capture - writing)
Title: All the Hounds of Hell
Author: [livejournal.com profile] lost_spook
Rating: All ages
Word Count: 2736
Characters/Pairings: Henry VII, Ace McShane, Seventh Doctor, Jasper Tudor
Notes/Warnings: Written for [livejournal.com profile] hc_bingo square “culture shock” and from a random characters meme that suggested Henry VII and Ace on a date - not that this could count as a date, except possibly by certain Ace-specific definitions. (I default to The Shadow of the Tower versions, because I do, but that’s otherwise irrelevant, really.) Set sometime in Brittany in the early 1470s.
Summary: Henry Tudor is used to people wanting him dead, but they don’t usually send the hounds of hell after him to accomplish it. Luckily, there’s a very odd girl looking out for him…

Also at AO3 and the Teaspoon (when it's verified).

All the Hounds of Hell )
lost_spook: (b7 - deva)
I've been a little quiet this week, because my friend was up visiting for two days, which was lovely (she is also the only person I know in rl who thinks watching creaky old cult TV is fun. O, guess what we did?), but then I was extremely tired after. I'm feeling a bit better now & decided that it might be a good moment to have another go at podficcing (because I'd already got myself used to speaking more earlier in the week and recovered from it, so...).

(I have complicated feelings about podfic, which mostly wind up at NOPE. However, I used to read aloud as part of my rl job & also had to think about making stuff accessible in as many formats as possible, and am rather worried about how silent I am for most of the time these days & how much it takes out of me when I do talk for very long, so carefully monitored speaking for x length and gradually building up via fic-reading seems like a useful plan. I just have to deal with all the other NOPES but we'll get there!)

Anyway, I started with this. The podfic is very basic & probably enough to make practised podficcers shudder, but I think it is at least fully audible and that was my chief aim. But I don't think people will be queuing up to listen to obscure ficlets in podfic-form anyway! (Er. I hope!)

Title: something in the heart
Author: [livejournal.com profile] lost_spook
Rating: All ages
Word Count: 730 words / 3.31 mins
Characters/Pairings: Henry VII/Elizabeth of York
Notes/Warnings: None. For [livejournal.com profile] hc_bingo square “trust issues”. My first podfic - very basic, no music or effects, but I think it is at least fairly audible throughout.
Summary: Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, at the beginning and at the end…

Also on the AO3 (with links to the original fic).

Cut for embedding & download )
lost_spook: (s&s - ot3)
Well, it did go live, and even though I think it may have been quieter than some years, I got rather a lot of nice things in my stocking!

[personal profile] liadtbunny wrote me Public Eye fic, If I had a Million Pounds and posted a small picspam of James Maxwell from a thing called The Prison. (It looks like a great source for if I wanted Copper-related pics of him.) I also had a picspam from [personal profile] dunderklumpen, who went to all the trouble of finding pics of my random favourite old TV actors for me here.

Clocket made me a brilliant bit of art of Frank Marker; [personal profile] finisterre made me some old TV icons & [personal profile] rosied found me a link to a huge list of genealogy blogs, so I should be able to find something interesting in there.

Also there was more fic! It's been a bumper holiday season for Sapphire & Steel, that's for certain.

I had The Bright Side of Time (Silver, Sapphire, the TARDIS, Clara & Twelve) by [personal profile] kaffyr, Something Hungry Under the Stone (Silver) by [personal profile] annariel, and Just Passing Through (Silver/Liz) by [personal profile] john_amend_all.

Thank you, everyone! ♥


I did manage to write three little ficlets, as follows under the cut, but I'm sorry I couldn't do more!

Ficlets in New Tricks, OUaT & Historical RPF )
lost_spook: (I Capture - writing)
So, I wrote things for Yuletide. Somewhat more than I expected...

Firstly, and most importantly, my assignment, which was for [livejournal.com profile] paranoidangel42. I had, when signing up initially, looked at my list of fandoms I was willing to write and said to myself I might as well have just said I'd write for Paranoidangel. And then laughed, shook my head at myself, reminded myself that Yuletide is a big exchange and added in a bunch of other fandoms... and then got assigned to Paranoidangel! (So, erm, sorry about that - you just got yet more of me instead of somebody new! I had fun writing for you, though! ♥)

Backstitch in Gold (3948 words) by lost_spook
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: The House of Eliott
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Beatrice Eliott & Evangeline Eliott, Beatrice Eliott/Jack Maddox
Characters: Beatrice Eliott, Evangeline Eliott, Jack Maddox
Additional Tags: Yuletide, 1920s, Fashion & Couture, Sister-Sister Relationship, Misses Clause Challenge, Women Being Awesome
Summary:

What has been well-stitched together doesn’t easily fray at the seams.



I'd been rewatching HoE recently and was determined to write fic for it, because there's so little of it, and knew what I wanted to do - a sort of big Bea and Evie across-the-years, culminating in a fixit for the ending. But then it seemed to fall flat in various places, and the ending wasn't quite how I remembered it, thus scuppering my planned final section and I floundered for a while. (I had in my head that Bea and Evie had a big row and, actually, they don't. Evie is angry at everyone, but Bea is muted, almost defeated.) However, eventually, I beat it into shape & hopefully it wasn't too bad! (I've learned by now, though, that I pretty much always feel my assignments are terrible - until the next year, when suddenly I realise that last year's was quite good... but this year's is terrible.)

Anyway, it was fun to write Bea & Evie, and I am still very fond of the series. (Which follows the fortunes of a pair of sisters who set up a London fashion house in the 1920s and is good fun & all up on YT if anyone is interested). I did want to work in more characters, though, and more social history... and, yes, well, possibly being unrealistic? I think in my head I wanted to write a big HofE novel, that's all. At least I finally came up with a title I liked. I had the summary before the fic, but it was in danger of being posted as "Untitled House of Eliott fic" as the deadline approached. (Backstitch is the strongest stitch commonly used for sewing & in gold, obviously, but also because that's how Jack refers to Bea early on. Hmm, I'm not sure now why I changed it from "Backstitch in Gold Thread" because that makes more sense! I shall go change it back.)

And more under the cut! )


Also I now know that it was Clocketpatch who risked complete obscurity by writing me that last minute Public Eye/Sapphire & Steel treat. (Thanks so much, Clocket! You're amazing!) My other wonderful gift was by DesertScribe, who's new to me, but whom I hope hasn't written their last S&S fic, because that one was excellent. ♥
lost_spook: (I Capture - writing)
(I still have space for more topics if anyone hasn't left me one yet! The original post is here should you wish to.)

[profile] ramasi requested: Book-to-movie (or tv) adaptations you like? (Or didn't like, if you feel like ranting).

My first thought was that this was a very nice question, the second that this could be a very long post if I'm not careful. So I made myself choose 5 favourites, setting myself a rough guideline for inclusion - something along the lines of "it needs to be something I've watched at least twice and should be where I read the book first". (And then promptly broke that rule with my first choice, as you do.) (The pics in this post, btw, are my screencaps, excepting those for the first two, which I stole from Google.)

Book to Screen adaptations )
lost_spook: (I Capture - writing)
My [community profile] unconventionalcourtship fic! Which is long, obscure, and very unexciting! Amazing!

Between Strangers (8918 words) by lost_spook
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Public Eye (TV)
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Frank Marker/Helen Mortimer
Characters: Frank Marker, Helen Mortimer
Additional Tags: Snowed In, Trope Subversion/Inversion, 1940s, Alternate Universe - Canon Divergence, Pre-Series, Curtain Fic
Summary: Trying to sell encyclopedias in the middle of the worst winter of the century wasn’t the best idea to begin with. And now Frank Marker's wound up trying to rescue a single mother and her baby who’ve been abandoned at a bus stop, and all he’s got to hand is a car that won’t go and several dozen copies of The A-Z of Everything... (Beta-ed by Persiflage).

It doesn't require canon knowledge... but I can't pretend much happens. There is snow and a cute car (I provided a link at the end). And it is a fic. I can say that much for it...

(I very much hope "proper" Public Eye fans don't look at AO3 much. I would probably be strung up for writing Romance novel-inspired Frank/Mrs Mortimer, I really would.)

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